Handouts

Over the last few years, Speech & Language Development Australia has developed more than 150 handouts to ensure educators are provided with current information and practical tools to use in their classroom.

Each month we will showcase a selection of our  handouts, as well as our top handouts that are a must read.

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  • Understanding Developmental Language Disorder
    Understanding Developmental Language Disorder

    Children with Developmental Language Disorder (formerly Specific Language Impairment) are as able and healthy as other children. With one exception, they have great difficulty thinking about, understanding and using language. They are often as intelligent as other children their age, but still have difficulties with language. There may be no outward signs of disability and no obvious physical indicators of a problem. For this reason, Developmental Language Disorder is also known as a ‘hidden disability’ affecting 1 in 14 children.

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  • Typical Speech Sound Development

    Developing the ability to communicate using clear speech sounds is an important part of early childhood development. Speech sound acquisition is a gradual process that is different for every child, and there is a wide range of ‘normal’ speech development. However, knowing what typical speech sound development looks like can be helpful in deciding whether a child’s speech needs further investigation.

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  • Typical Language Development- Birth to 2 years

    Children grow and develop at different rates. However, most pass through developmental milestones in a progressive and predictable pattern, with skills building from simple to complex over time. For example, a typically developing child will begin babbling single syllables (4-6 months) before using multiple syllables (7-9 months), and then progress to using meaningful words (12-18 months).

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  • Typical Language Development- 2-4 years

    Children grow and develop at different rates. However, most pass through developmental milestones in a progressive and predictable pattern, with skills building from simple to complex over time.

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  • Typical Language Development- 4-8 years

    Children grow and develop at different rates. However, most pass through developmental milestones in a progressive and predictable pattern, with skills building from simple to complex over time.

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  • Foundations for Learning Framework

    The ‘Foundations for Learning’ framework, developed by Speech & Language Development Australia (SALDA), provides a useful visual to understand and explore the various domains of development. All children develop skills within these domains at different rates. It is important to understand a child’s strengths and areas of need to support their access to learning. This handout will explain the different domains to support a holistic understanding of students with Language Disorder.

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  • Animal Walks

    Animal walks are a gross motor movement in which students mimic the movements of well-known animals. Animal walks are a fun and great exercise for students to work on important gross motor skills, core strengthening, motor planning, balance, coordination, flexibility and endurance. Animal walks also help to improve proprioceptive input and spatial awareness through the heavy work and deep pressure on the muscles, tendons and joints.

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  • Balance

    Balance describes our ability to maintain control over our body when performing certain tasks. We have two types of balance: static and dynamic. Static balance is our ability to keep our body controlled when still, things like sitting and standing. Dynamic balance is our ability to keep control over our body when moving, activities like running, jumping, hopping, skipping and bike riding.

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  • Ball Skills

    Ball skills, such as throwing, catching and kicking, are fundamental gross motor tasks that are necessary for the growth of certain childhood developmental skills such as hand-eye coordination, balance, bilateral integration, timing, sequencing and motor planning. Ball skills are also essential to prepare students for physical activity at school and extra-curricular sport. It is important that students in the early years of schooling be given many opportunities to develop these skills so they have the chance to improve their strength, posture, enhance confidence, social skills and a sense of achievement.

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  • Bilateral Integration

    Bilateral integration describes the ability to use both hands/arms at the same time in a coordinated and efficient manner to complete a task or activity. Bilateral integration skills are necessary for tasks such as writing, cutting, dressing, and toy use.

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  • Low Muscle Tone

    Muscle tone relates to the amount of tension in a muscle. We need to maintain a certain level of muscle tone in order to uphold particular body positions. Sometimes, muscle tone can be described as low, or “hypotonia.” Low tone refers to when a muscle doesn’t have enough tension in it. It may feel “floppy” and you may notice that your child lacks control of limbs/their body. They need to work a bit harder in order to maintain certain postures or do certain tasks.

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  • Motor Planning

    Motor planning (coordination) refers to our ability to be able to do multiple tasks one after the other. First we think of an idea for what we want to do. Next we work out how we’re going to do it and finally we do it. As we get more proficient at the task, this process becomes automatic and we don’t have to put so much time and thought into it. Following directions, getting dressed, hopscotch, skipping and ball sports all require the ability to motor plan.

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  • Positive Behaviour Support

    Positive Behaviour Support is a comprehensive approach to assessment, planning and intervention that focuses on addressing students’ needs, their environment and overall quality of life. Positive Behaviour Support is about working in partnership to develop a shared understanding about why the student has a need to engage in challenging behaviour.

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